Reshared post from Jon Lawhead

"The idea was that if people could come to a shared understanding or at least agree toward the model of the world, then they would be much more in agreement about the policy we should take.

CP: So in a way, a system like that could be used to externalize mental models and create a collective model."?

Yes!

Jon Lawhead originally shared this post:

"WW: We did a project actually several years ago called Sim Health for the Markle Foundation in New York. It was a simulation of the national healthcare system, but underneath the whole thing, the assumptions of the model were exposed. And you could change your assumptions, for example, as to how many nurses it takes to staff a hospital, or how many emergency room visits you would have given certain parameters, etc., etc. The idea was that people could kind of argue over policy but eventually that argument would come down to the assumptions of the model. And this was a tool for them to actually get into the assumptions of the model. When people disagree over what policy we should be following, the disagreement flows out of a disagreement about their model of the world. The idea was that if people could come to a shared understanding or at least agree toward the model of the world, then they would be much more in agreement about the policy we should take.

CP: So in a way, a system like that could be used to externalize mental models and create a collective model.

WW: Yes, exactly. Which I think could have value, but at the same time I like this idea that there’s this diversity of models out there.

CP: Well, I think if you have a shared model, it’s not so much like you all have the same mental model, but that you have an externalized model that everyone agrees to abide by.

WW: Yeah, which is exactly the way science works.

CP: When you were talking about Go, I was thinking that when you create a mental model of the environment as it is now, you’re also creating a model of how you want it to be. So in Go the mental models have to do with imagining where the players want the game to go, right?

WW: Right.

CP: And then as the game fills itself out, as the emergent properties come forth."

Game Studies 0102: Sims, BattleBots, Cellular Automata, God and Go. By Celia Pearce

The first scholarly journal on computer games

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