The Power of Fear in Networked Publics Radical…

The Power of Fear in Networked Publics

Radical transparency is particularly tricky in light of the attention economy. Not all information is created equal. People are far more likely to pay attention to some kinds of information than others. And, by and large, they're more likely to pay attention to information that causes emotional reactions. Additionally, people are more likely to pay attention to some people. The person with the boring life is going to get far less attention than the person that seems like a trainwreck. Who gets attention – and who suffers the consequences of attention – is not evenly distributed.

And, unfortunately, oppressed and marginalized populations who are already under the microscope tend to suffer far more from the rise of radical transparency than those who already have privilege. The cost of radical transparency for someone who is gay or black or female is different in Western societies than it is for a straight white male. This is undoubtedly a question of privacy, but we should also look at it through the prism of the culture of fear.

Full article: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/2012/SXSW2012.html

Taken from http://boingboing.net/2012/04/25/how-a-culture-of-fear-thrives.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

h/t +Boing Boing +Rebecca Spizzirri

#attentioneconomy

http://vimeo.com/38139635

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